Real estate liquidators’ lawsuit seeks more money after $30M sale

An Illinois real estate liquidator’s lawsuit filed Friday seeks more than $30 million after a $3.2 million sale of her home, citing the lack of a security deposit.

In court papers filed Thursday, the Illinois attorney general’s office said a Chicago-based property management company failed to provide proper security deposits for the sale and a “fraudulent misrepresentation” led to the $1.7 million sale.

“The sale of Ms. Brown’s home was not a proper and lawful sale of the property,” the attorney general said.

The attorney general says Ms.”

The sale contract, in fact, was signed by one of Ms Smiths attorneys and signed by another of Ms Brown’s attorneys, with a signature that was not hers, and signed without Ms. A. B. Brown and her signature on the contract.”

The attorney general says Ms.

Brown, now 55, paid $7,500 for the home and was due $8,500 more after taxes, a “mistake” that resulted in the “further sale” of the home, which was “failing to disclose that it had no security deposit.”

She has sued the company for wrongful death and aggravated false imprisonment.

The attorney department says a separate case filed last week by the Illinois Department of Revenue, which is prosecuting the case, alleges the sale of another home that Ms.

Smiths sold in 2013.

The two other homes in question were purchased in 2011 and 2014 by the same seller, according to the attorney department.

The case will be reviewed by a Cook County judge, who will determine if it qualifies for a trial.

Real estate liquidators’ lawsuit seeks more money after $30M sale

An Illinois real estate liquidator’s lawsuit filed Friday seeks more than $30 million after a $3.2 million sale of her home, citing the lack of a security deposit.

In court papers filed Thursday, the Illinois attorney general’s office said a Chicago-based property management company failed to provide proper security deposits for the sale and a “fraudulent misrepresentation” led to the $1.7 million sale.

“The sale of Ms. Brown’s home was not a proper and lawful sale of the property,” the attorney general said.

The attorney general says Ms.”

The sale contract, in fact, was signed by one of Ms Smiths attorneys and signed by another of Ms Brown’s attorneys, with a signature that was not hers, and signed without Ms. A. B. Brown and her signature on the contract.”

The attorney general says Ms.

Brown, now 55, paid $7,500 for the home and was due $8,500 more after taxes, a “mistake” that resulted in the “further sale” of the home, which was “failing to disclose that it had no security deposit.”

She has sued the company for wrongful death and aggravated false imprisonment.

The attorney department says a separate case filed last week by the Illinois Department of Revenue, which is prosecuting the case, alleges the sale of another home that Ms.

Smiths sold in 2013.

The two other homes in question were purchased in 2011 and 2014 by the same seller, according to the attorney department.

The case will be reviewed by a Cook County judge, who will determine if it qualifies for a trial.